Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights Repository

The Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) Repository, managed by the Aga Khan University Libraries, is a digital repository offering a central location for the deposit, maintenance and long-term preservation of the research and other scholarly production on Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights Repository in Eastern Mediterranean Region. One of our key missions is to ensure that these scholarly and creative endeavors are accessible to the widest possible audience. Candidates for deposit in SRHR Repository include guidelines: Guidelines, SRHR Evidence (including best practice, Systematic reviews), SRHR Policies and strategic plans (resolutions), Training resources (including regional resources), Monitoring & Evaluation Tools (including surveys), Statistics and SRHR Communication Material (Digital Media (Videos / Infographics). For more information about submitting your work to SRHR IR, please contact us at repositorysrhr@gmail.com

Recent Submissions

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    Development of indicators to measure health system capacity for quality abortion care in 10 countries: a rapid assessment of a measurement framework and indicators
    (BMJ Public Health, 2024-05-06) Heidi Bart, Johnston; Ulrika Rehnstrom, Loi; Mohamed, Ali; Katy, Footman; Ghislaine Glitho, Alinsato; Eman, Aly; Asmani, Chilanga; Shikha, Bansal; Laurence, Codjia; Fahdi, Dkhimi; Sithembile, Dlamini-Nqeketo; Hayfa, Elamin; Dina, Gbenou; Karima, Gholbzouri; Lisa, Hedman; Nilmini, Hemachandra; Yelmali, Hien; Md Khurshid Alam, Hyder; Theopista, John; Amrita, Kansal; Priya, Karna; Laurence, Läser; Antonella, Lavelanet; Belete, Mihretu; Pamela Amaka, Onyiah; Leopold, Ouedraogo; Sikander, Qais; Ellen, Thom; Meera, Upadhyay; Qudsia, Uzma; Souleymane, Zan; Bela, Ganatra
    Introduction: A significant gap exists in the availability of indicators and tools to monitor health system capacity for quality abortion care at input and process levels. In this paper, we describe the process and results of developing and assessing indicators to monitor health system capacity strengthening for quality abortion care.Methods: As part of a 4-year (2019–2022) multicountry project focused on preventing unsafe abortion using a health system strengthening approach in 10 countries, we developed a monitoring framework with indicators and metadata. Through an internal consultative process, we identified a structured list of operational health system capacity indicators for abortion. After implementing the indicators for baseline and annual project monitoring, project staff from 10 teams assessed each indicator using 4 criteria: validity, feasibility, usefulness and importance.Results: We identified 30 indicators aligning with 5 of the 6 WHO health system building blocks (excluding service delivery): 6 indicators in leadership and governance, 5 in health workforce, 6 in health information, 8 in access to medicines and health products and 5 in health financing. In our assessment of indicators, average scores against the predetermined criteria were lowest for feasibility (7.7 out of 10) compared with importance (8.5), usefulness (8.9) and validity (9.3). Assessors highlighted the need for fewer and less complex indicators, simplified language, clearer benchmarks, for indicators to be abortion-specific, less subjective and for future frameworks to also include service delivery and research and innovation.Conclusion: We used 30 indicators to monitor health system capacity for quality abortion care in 10 countries and gathered critical feedback that can be used to further strengthen the set of indicators in future work. Establishing core input and process indicators will be critical to inform and support evidence-based policy and programme improvements for quality abortion care.
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    Do you know your family planning choices?
    (World Health Organization, 2022) WHO; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Center for Communication Programs
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    Family planning: a global handbook for providers: evidence-based guidance developed through worldwide collaboration, Updated 4th edition 2022
    (World Health Organization, 2022) WHO; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Center for Communication Programs
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    Knowledge of Thai women in cervical cancer etiology and screening
    (Plos One, 2023-05-18) Khomphaiboonkij, Uraiwan; Sreamsukcharoenchai, Nattapong; Pitakkarnkul, Supakorn; Rittiluechai, Kristsanamon; Tangjitgamol, Siriwan
    Knowledge about cervical cancer screening and Human papilloma virus (HPV) influence on their awareness to the cervical cancer screening program. Most previous studies found inadequate knowledge and attitude among healthy women affect the low rate of screening. This study aimed to assess knowledge of cervical cancer screening and HPV in women who had abnormal cervical cancer screening in Bangkok. Thai women, aged ≥ 18 years old, who had abnormal cervical cancer screening and scheduled to colposcopy clinics of 10 participating hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. The participants were asked to complete a self-answer questionnaire (Thai language). The questionnaire composed of 3 parts: (I) demographic data, (II) knowledge about cervical cancer screening and (III) knowledge about HPV. Among 499 women who answered the questionnaires, 2 had missing demographic data. The mean age of the participants was 39.28 ± 11.36 years. 70% of them had experience of cervical cancer screening, with 22.7% had previous abnormal cytologic results. Out of 14 questions, the mean score of knowledge about cervical cancer screening was 10.04 ± 2.37. Only 26.9% had good knowledge about cervical cancer screening. Nearly 96% of woman did not know that screening should be done. After excluding 110 women who had never known about HPV, 25.2% had good knowledge about HPV. From multivariable analysis, only younger age (≤ 40 years) was associated with good knowledge of cervical cancer screening and HPV. In the conclusion, only 26.9% of women in this study had good knowledge regarding cervical cancer screening. Likewise, 20.1% of women who had ever heard about HPV has good knowledge about HPV. Providing information about cervical cancer screening and HPV should improve the women's knowledge and better adherence to the screening procedure.