Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights Repository

The Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) Repository, managed by the Aga Khan University Libraries, is a digital repository offering a central location for the deposit, maintenance and long-term preservation of the research and other scholarly production on Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights Repository in Eastern Mediterranean Region. One of our key missions is to ensure that these scholarly and creative endeavors are accessible to the widest possible audience. Candidates for deposit in SRHR Repository include guidelines: Guidelines, SRHR Evidence (including best practice, Systematic reviews), SRHR Policies and strategic plans (resolutions), Training resources (including regional resources), Monitoring & Evaluation Tools (including surveys), Statistics and SRHR Communication Material (Digital Media (Videos / Infographics). For more information about submitting your work to SRHR IR, please contact us at repositorysrhr@gmail.com

Recent Submissions

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    Do you know your family planning choices?
    (World Health Organization, 2022) WHO; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Center for Communication Programs
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    Family planning: a global handbook for providers: evidence-based guidance developed through worldwide collaboration, Updated 4th edition 2022
    (World Health Organization, 2022) WHO; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Center for Communication Programs
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    Knowledge of Thai women in cervical cancer etiology and screening
    (Plos One, 2023-05-18) Khomphaiboonkij, Uraiwan; Sreamsukcharoenchai, Nattapong; Pitakkarnkul, Supakorn; Rittiluechai, Kristsanamon; Tangjitgamol, Siriwan
    Knowledge about cervical cancer screening and Human papilloma virus (HPV) influence on their awareness to the cervical cancer screening program. Most previous studies found inadequate knowledge and attitude among healthy women affect the low rate of screening. This study aimed to assess knowledge of cervical cancer screening and HPV in women who had abnormal cervical cancer screening in Bangkok. Thai women, aged ≥ 18 years old, who had abnormal cervical cancer screening and scheduled to colposcopy clinics of 10 participating hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. The participants were asked to complete a self-answer questionnaire (Thai language). The questionnaire composed of 3 parts: (I) demographic data, (II) knowledge about cervical cancer screening and (III) knowledge about HPV. Among 499 women who answered the questionnaires, 2 had missing demographic data. The mean age of the participants was 39.28 ± 11.36 years. 70% of them had experience of cervical cancer screening, with 22.7% had previous abnormal cytologic results. Out of 14 questions, the mean score of knowledge about cervical cancer screening was 10.04 ± 2.37. Only 26.9% had good knowledge about cervical cancer screening. Nearly 96% of woman did not know that screening should be done. After excluding 110 women who had never known about HPV, 25.2% had good knowledge about HPV. From multivariable analysis, only younger age (≤ 40 years) was associated with good knowledge of cervical cancer screening and HPV. In the conclusion, only 26.9% of women in this study had good knowledge regarding cervical cancer screening. Likewise, 20.1% of women who had ever heard about HPV has good knowledge about HPV. Providing information about cervical cancer screening and HPV should improve the women's knowledge and better adherence to the screening procedure.
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    Mapping evidence of self-sampling to diagnose sexually transmitted infections in women: a scoping review
    (Diagnostics (Basel, Switzerland), 2022-07-26) Jaya, Ziningi N.; Mapanga, Witness; Niekerk, Brian van; Dlangalala, Thobeka; Kgarosi, Kabelo; Dzobo, Mathias; Mulqueeny, Delarise; Mashamba-Thompson, Tivani P.
    Background: Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are a major global healthcare burden, disproportionately affecting women. Self-sampling interventions for diagnostic purposes have the potential to improve STI healthcare management and expand STI services. However, there is currently no published evidence of the global use of self-sampling interventions to diagnose STIs in women. The main aim of this scoping review was to map evidence on the use of self-sampling interventions to diagnose STIs in women. Methodology: The methodology of this scoping review was guided by Arksey and O’Malley and Levac. A comprehensive literature search was conducted in PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Medline (EBSCO), ProQuest, and Cochrane. For grey literature, a search was conducted in Open Grey, World Health Organization, Google, and conference proceedings and dissertations. All search results were screened and assessed for eligibility. Thereafter data from eligible studies was extracted and analysed. The quality of these studies was appraised using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool 2018 version. Results: A total of 770 articles were retrieved from databases and grey literature sources. A total of 44 studies were eligible for data extraction following title, abstract and full-text screening. Of the included studies, 63% presented evidence of research conducted in high-income countries and 37% presented evidence in low- and middle-income countries. Studies presented evidence on the following: feasibility of self-sampling in remote areas; acceptance and ease of use of self-sampling interventions; types of self-sampled specimens; pooled samples for diagnosing STIs; laboratory diagnostic assays for STI using self-sampled specimens; and self-testing of self-sampled specimens. Conclusions: Self-sampling interventions are feasible and easy to use and, therefore, can improve STI management and treatment in women across various age groups and various access levels to good-quality healthcare. Despite this, there is a lack of evidence of self-sampling interventions designed according to user preferences. We recommend studies to collaborate with women to co-develop user-friendly self-sampling interventions to diagnose STIs in women.